CSS

Computational Class

unknown computational class

Programming Paradigms

Defined by

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/

Commentary

If I, as a programmer, were to tell you that CSS is the ultimate hacking language, would you be surprised? After all, it's not even a programming language, really. But that doesn't really matter, does it? It meets the only possible criterion there could be for the ultimate hacking language: in order to achieve the effect that what you want, you have to hack and hack and hack...

So, I have a question. If CSS is so superior to those awful tables which should never ever be used for layout, how come a simple and much desired three-column layout, so trivial to construct with a table, is considered one of the holy grails of CSS?

Seems that the real solution to this would be to have some set of elements that has the layout behaviour of tables but without the "treat this as tabular data, would you please" semantics. I suppose that's what display: table-cell et al is for — if only more browsers supported it.

I kvetch, but there is one very nice thing about CSS: unlike Javascript, it's declarative, and nowhere near as powerful as a Turing machine. So, it might make your page look ugly in nine out of ten browsers six out of seven days of the week, but at least it probably won't hang, or crash, or corrupt the browser's state.